The Rocket – Now Available for Free

You’ll be happy to know that I’m now including The Rocket in my list of titles available for free over at Free Stuff. The Rocket, of course, is my Twilight Zone-esque tale of a man confronting his absent father, right before humanity’s extinction. Not a bad read, according to people other than myself. Here’s the description:

In the last few hours before life on earth ends, a young dad has a chance meeting with his estranged father. Will this be a moment of reconciliation, or recrimination? How can you communicate with someone who refuses to listen? Mike Crane takes one last shot to save his father’s life before he boards THE ROCKET.

Get The Rocket For Free Now

Gandalf Sax Cat!

This is totally dumb, but funny. Someone posted a video of a sneezing cat and it syncs up perfectly with the Gandalf Sax video. So, with the magic of Adobe Premiere, I made sure you can now enjoy:

Don’t forget to take your Claritin.

 

Sunday Night Nerding

Hard at work doing a few nerdy tech things for the website. Retooling the automation behind this blog post and I’ll post an updated how-to later on.

Additionally, updating the graphics around the site to reflect our scifi heritage. Hope you enjoy them.

Getting all this stuff done so I can go work on Mesh tomorrow. Nighty-night.

One Big Fat Reason I Keep My Mouth Shut

I only ran across this article the other day, but the second I read it, I was like “I must blog this.” The cautionary tale of Kosoko Jackson perfectly illustrates the one big fat reason I keep my mouth shut when it comes to current events, social issues or anything not having to do with my writing.

Jackson, in a nutshell, is an underknown YA author like me. Not afraid to make his opinions known, he found himself the target of social media outrage when an upcoming novel met with accusations of insensitivity. Before you could say ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ Jackson’s book was dead on the vine, a victim of the controversy. Kosoko Jackson has since moved onto other projects.

So imagine that you spend hundreds of hours developing and writing a story. Hundreds more finding an agent, a publisher, an editor. Here comes your moment, the part in the story where your book, your novel, is out there in the universe. Then, before that moment can happen, your project explodes. You watch your dream, your baby, burn like a roman candle. The dream is over before it got started. What an awful, sickening feeling that must be.

Reason makes no bones about the implications: “Maybe there’s some actual fire here, but determining that would require a close read of the sort that sociopathic social-media dogpilings rarely afford. Zooming out, these episodes will inevitably affect YA publishing, and perhaps other areas of publishing if the fever spreads.”

I’m just a guy, a guy who writes stories. News like this make me want to crawl in a hole, be happy with my disability check, and forget I ever heard of book called ‘Mesh.’ It also helps explain why my social media engagement is pretty neutral when it comes to controversy. My voice is something I’m responsible for, and honestly I can’t handle the responsibility of being a mouthpiece. Please don’t ask.

All of this makes me think of that famous quote: Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and to remove all doubt. – Maurice Switzer, but commonly attributed to Abraham Lincoln

I’m keeping my mouth shut, and writing my books. I hope, at the end of the day, that it’s worth something.

What Mesh Means to Readers

Beta Readers are connecting with Mesh in a lot of different ways. I got this email yesterday from Mike in Tampa. He helped me explain something I couldn’t have done on my own – what Mesh means to readers. I got a lump in my throat reading this:

Jackson,

We were discussing, more informally, how I felt about Roman having a disability. I’d be more than happy to go on the record and say that I loved it, and here’s why. I have Epilepsy. It’s not even remotely the same disability that Roman has, but it’s a disability that has affected my life in some pretty negative ways. I have scars all across my body, including 2nd and 3rd degree burns, from my Epilepsy. I was forced to drop out of highschool, I only got my GED this past December. 
I relate to Roman because he was treated differently due to his disability, just like I was. I was babied, and I was picked on. I was treated like I couldn’t do even the simplest things for myself, and I was treated like I was faking, things I’ve noticed with Roman. I also had to have the help of technology to help me, like Roman did, though mine was an implant (VNS). 
Please, on behalf of the other cripples, keep Roman the way he is. He gave me hope when I was breaking my face every day during seizures, and I’m sure he’ll help other cripple kids.


As I said before, I want Roman to be a kid who’s ‘trying.’ Trying means different things to different people. For Mike, it’s about getting past his difficulties and Roman gives him someone to relate to. We’ll see what other people say in the months ahead, but for now I wanted to share this with you.
Thanks, Mike. :-}

New Microfiction – Battlefield Surgeon

I started writing ‘Battlefield Surgeon’ in response to the following writer’s prompt on Reddit: “You are a surgeon working the front lines of the American Civil War. 2 soldiers bring in another, shot twice, one in each leg. Looking closely you realize it is your brother. “Fix him up enough that he can be hanged for desertion” one of them says.”

War isn’t something to be glorified. This prompt struck a chord with me simply because it illustrates the impossible circumstances that humanity can put itself in. War is a horror, how should a doctor respond? I took inspiration from An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce and started typing.

Read ‘Battlefield Surgeon’ here

Here’s Why You Write Every Day: Jerry Seinfeld

Love him or hate him, Jerry Seinfeld is both talented and hardworking. His rockstar career in the world of comedy is due in no small part to his work ethic and the structure he brings to his craft. Here, in this video cast with Tom Pappa, Jerry discusses why you write every day. As a writer, I found a ton of valuable insights and you will, too. Take a look:

It would be fair call this a ‘masterclass in creative professionalism.’ You have to structure your creativity, hold yourself accountable, and get your stuff out there so you can learn and get better. Not everyone is willing to put the hours in, but Jerry is, and that’s why he’s Seinfeld.

So at the end of the day, don’t be afraid to put the work in. It can only lead you to good places. Enough talk for now. Time for me to get back to work.

Your Top Ten Biggest Scifi Writing Mistakes

You. Yes, you. Stop right now and jot this down. There was a thread over at /r/scifi that listed out the biggest mistakes in scifi and I couldn’t help but take note. You should too, because these people are our readers and when they talk, we need to listen with both ears. To keep it super-simple, I compiled some of the best ones into a handy Top-Ten format. I want to keep this for my future reference and yours, too.

Good scifi cannot save bad writing. I think we all know that. At the same time, bad writing can be forgiven under certain circumstances (Looking at you, Ready Player One). Ideas, premises, tech that would interest a PhD cannot be mated to sixth-grade prose, just like you can’t expect to run an F1 car with a toddler at the wheel. We know that, too. So the question is, how to you write good-sci-fi? I’m still trying to figure that out. In the meantime, here are some ways to avoid writing bad science fiction. Let’s look at the top ten worst offenders, in no particular order: Continue reading